hitrecord:

“A hairy collective”
Illustration by Inger
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MattConley (Community Director) writes:
Fabulous illustration by Inger! The Tiny Story by Laateedoe is excellent as well. I wonder if that story could be remixed by text editors a bit further, or new stories could also be written for this.
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Contribute your Tiny Stories HERE!

hitrecord:

“A hairy collective”

Illustration by Inger

==

MattConley (Community Director) writes:

Fabulous illustration by Inger! The Tiny Story by Laateedoe is excellent as well. I wonder if that story could be remixed by text editors a bit further, or new stories could also be written for this.

==

Contribute your Tiny Stories HERE!

sciencesoup:

A Strange Kind of Taxidermy

These techni-coloured cadavers are a weird combination of science and art, created by Iori Tomita, a Japanese artist and a lifelong fisherman. As an undergrad, he studied ichthyology—the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish—where he first saw a fish turned transparent. Since then, he has combined classical preservation techniques with staining methods to create thousands of beautiful but eccentric shells of marine creatures, gradually mastering the nuances of refining form and colour. His process can take up to a year, but it produces a brilliant result. He begins by preserving creatures in formaldehyde, then removes the scales and skin and leaves the creature to soak in a mixture of blue stain, ethl alcohol, and clacial acetic acid. Next, he uses the digestive enzyme trypsin to break down the proteins and muscles—stopping the process before the creature loses its form, but just after it becomes transparent. The bones are then soaked in a mix of potassium hydropxide and red dye, and the creature is preserved in a jar of glycerin. Tomita calls the series “New World Transparent Specimens”.

Visit Tomita’s website

kittycreative:

Betty Pepper textile art - old books transformed with decorative and textured elements.

hitrecordjoe:

hitrecord:

“Gardening”
Illustration by aamanddacc
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wirrow (Global Curator) writes:
this illustration really hits me somewhere in the heart. to me it’s kind of like how we hold on to some things and it’s hard to let go but when we eventually cut them loose.. new things grow. i wish i could put that into a tiny story, i tried but nothing good came out. such a cool drawing.
==
Contribute your Tiny Story HERE!

This illustration is definitely in need of a story.  Any ideas?
Contribute your stories HERE!
<3
J

hitrecordjoe:

hitrecord:

“Gardening”

Illustration by aamanddacc

==

wirrow (Global Curator) writes:

this illustration really hits me somewhere in the heart. to me it’s kind of like how we hold on to some things and it’s hard to let go but when we eventually cut them loose.. new things grow. i wish i could put that into a tiny story, i tried but nothing good came out. such a cool drawing.

==

Contribute your Tiny Story HERE!

This illustration is definitely in need of a story.  Any ideas?

Contribute your stories HERE!

<3

J

sheeennen:

damn..

sheeennen:

damn..

(Source: the-modern-lover)

fuckyeaarthistory:

Veiled LadyRaffaelo Montic. 1860Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN, USA
This is an amazing execution of trompe l’oeil. I can hardly believe this is pure marble.

fuckyeaarthistory:

Veiled Lady
Raffaelo Monti
c. 1860
Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN, USA

This is an amazing execution of trompe l’oeil. I can hardly believe this is pure marble.

(Source: thomassaliot)

jtotheizzoe:

myedol:

The Tissue Series are a collection of anatomical cross sections using quilled paper, created by Lisa Nilsson

Today’s theme is turning into paper-based science art, it looks like. First it’s computational origami, now it’s anatomy lessons via quilled paper.

I’m ok with that.

More at Lisa Nilsson’s website.

fuckyeahartandscience:

kqedscience:

A developmental biologist and high-end fashion designer — team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life

Primitive Streak ~ Helen Storey

the-star-stuff:

Geeky Math Equation Creates Beautiful 3-D World

This article was published by Wired on December 9, 2009. This is not a new news but I still find it amazing. The first time I saw this, I was like, “WHOOAAH! These are beautiful!”  

This article was about the Mandelbulb. A group of math geeks created a three-dimensional analogue for the mesmerizing Mandelbrot fractal. The 3-D renderings were generated by applying an iterative algorithm to a sphere. The same calculation is applied over and over to the sphere’s points in three dimensions. In spirit, that’s similar to how the original 2-D Mandelbrot set generates its infinite and self-repeating complexity.